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Some Interesting Facts About Daylight Saving Time

March 11, 2012 by John Rook

Daylight Saving Time officially kicked in at 2 a.m. this morning, but if your clocks haven't done it on their own, make sure to set all of them ahead by one hour this morning.
In case you were wondering a little bit about Daylight Savings, below are a few unique facts that might pique your interest:

*While in America, Daylight Saving begins at 2 a.m. on the second Sunday in March, in the European Union, Summer Time begins and ends at 1 a.m. Universal Time (Greenwich Mean Time). It begins the last Sunday in March and ends the last Sunday in October. In the EU, all time zones change at the same moment.

*Though it is often referred to as Daylight Savings Time, it is officially Daylight Saving Time.

*For the U.S. and its territories, Daylight Saving Time is not observed in Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, and Arizona.

*A man, born just after 12 a.m. DST, circumvented the Vietnam War draft by using a daylight saving time loophole. When drafted, he argued that standard time, not DST, was the official time for recording births in his state of Delaware in the year of his birth. Thus, under official standard time he was actually born on the previous day--and that day had a much higher draft lottery number, allowing him to avoid the draft.

*In September 1999, the West Bank was on Daylight Saving Time while Israel had just switched back to standard time. West Bank terrorists prepared time bombs and smuggled them to their Israeli counterparts, who misunderstood the time on the bombs. As the bombs were being planted, they exploded--one hour too early--killing three terrorists instead of the intended victims--two busloads of people.

*While twins born at 11:55 p.m. and 12:05 a.m. may have different birthdays, Daylight Saving Time can change birth order -- on paper, anyway. During the time change in the fall, one baby could be born at 1:55 a.m. and the sibling born ten minutes later, at 1:05 a.m. In the spring, there is a gap when no babies are born at all: from 2 a.m. to 3 a.m.

*As with the U.S., Great Britain has had a checkered past with Daylight Saving Time (or Summer Time, as it is known there). In the early part of the 20th century, citizens protested at the change, using the slogan, “Give us back our stolen hour.”

The information above was provided by Webexhibits.org.

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